Published by Neide Published on July 14, 2017

USA Today wasn’t the only publication Lily spoke to while doing press for To The Bone. Harper’s Bazaar was another publication that Lily spoke with, in which she is questioned about how she did research for the movie, the key factors that helped her recover from the eating disorder and what advice would she give anyone who’s suffering from it.

Playing an anorexia victim would be a challenging role for any actress, let alone if they’ve suffered from an eating disorder in the past. Lily Collins took the risk when she took on To The Bone, which stages the journey of a young woman battling with anorexia as she enters a group rehabilitation home.

Directed by Marti Noxon – best known for her producing and directing work on TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer – the film is part autobiographical, rendering it more accurate than former, more simplistic screen representations of the disorder – there are secret sit-ups in the dead of the night, xylophone chests and animal-like cries of the truly tormented. Although expectedly disturbing in parts, it’s also flecked with a dark humour that was important to both Collins and Noxon.

Collins herself lost a huge amount of weight for the part and, harrowingly, was even complimented on her appearance – a dangerous situation to be in for someone who has fought an eating disorder in the past. However, it’s exactly reactions like these that prompted her to sign up to the film – which at that point didn’t even have a distributor.

Ahead of the film’s Netflix release on Friday 14 July, we talked to Collins about the project and how it helped her come to terms with her own relationship with food.

Given your history, did you have any reservations about taking the role on?

“I got this script randomly – I had ironically just written a chapter in my book about my history having an eating disorder just a week prior. So it felt that the universe was saying that this is probably something you should be talking about on a much larger scale. I never reached the point where I needed medical attention and went to hospital, so I never took the time to talk about the facts. You tend to surround yourself with myth when you’re going through an eating disorder. I saw it as an opportunity to better understand my disorder better. I was nervous, but also really excited to finally tell my story through a character, but also unburden myself. It was very freeing.”

Published by Neide Published on

Lily sat down with USA Today recently, where she spoke about why she chose to take on the role of Ellen in Netflix’s anorexia movie, her own experiences and much more. You can read the whole interview bellow!

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — In Netflix’s new anorexia movie To the Bone (streaming Friday), Lily Collins’ character Ellen has a compulsive habit of measuring her tiny arm. The young woman wraps her thumb and middle finger around her barely-there bicep to check that her fingertips meet. They usually do — that’s how sickly she is — and indicate how small Collins chose to get for the part.

Beefing up and slimming down for roles is all part of the job of an actor. But for Collins, 28, there was an added danger: She wanted to look like someone with anorexia, years after overcoming her own disordered eating, which included consuming nearly nothing, using diet pills and throwing up.

“I personally knew that this was something I needed to do to tell this story,” says Collins, who struggled with both anorexia and bulimia. “I wanted to be able to best exert my experiences on (Ellen) by going to the lengths I felt comfortable going to as an actor.”

That meant looking thin enough to worry her fans, who “lovingly, were concerned” after seeing the actress in paparazzi photos taken while she was preparing for the movie. She won’t disclose how much she lost, “but I was held accountable by a nutritionist, by (our director), by my mother, by our producer,” she says.

“There was never any time limit, there was never a (weight) number, (but) I didn’t want to get to the end of this experience and feel like I didn’t access what I needed to portray Ellen,” says Collins, who on this day at the London West Hollywood hotel looks radiant and “strong,” as the film’s writer/director Marti Noxon points out. “I can honestly say I gave it everything that I could and was able to stay Lily.”

Published by Neide Published on June 27, 2017

TORONTO – Lily Collins says she’s long been fascinated with food documentaries and mindful about what she puts on her plate.

“I’m not a red meat eater currently, I haven’t been for a very long time,” says the Golden Globe-nominated actress, who is the daughter of singer Phil Collins.

“I love fish though. So I enjoy vegan tendencies and vegetarian food, but I’m not full either way.”

But shooting the new Netflix film “Okja,” about the strong bond between a South Korean girl (played by Ahn Seo-Hyun) and her genetically modified “superpig” created by a livestock company, added a new level of resonance for her.

“This movie just made me more of a conscious consumer, even just in regards to other types of products, whether it’s shampoos … or whatnot,” says Collins, who also stars in the upcoming Netflix film “To the Bone.”

Director/co-writer Bong Joon-ho’s fable, which also stars Tilda Swinton and Jake Gyllenhaal, hits Netflix and Toronto’s TIFF Bell Lightbox on Wednesday.

The Canadian Press spoke with Collins about her character, who is a member of an animal rights group that tries to free the animal and hundreds of other superpigs from being killed at a factory farm. Swinton plays two characters — sisters who lead the family-owned multinational conglomerate that created the pigs — while Gyllenhaal plays a TV zoologist working on behalf of the company.

Published by Neide Published on May 26, 2017

 

Ten years ago, actress Lily Collins was on vacation in Cannes with her family when she first saw the Grand Palais. “I remember seeing the steps and thinking, ‘One day maybe, that would be amazing.’ And now, I’m walking the steps, linking arms with my co-stars. It is such a crazy, magical experience!” beamed Collins, 28, catching a break at the Carlton Hotel, where her film Okja, premiered to raves the night before. It is the newest film from Korean director Bong Joo Hoo, and follows Mija (An Seo Hyun), a young girl in South Korea whose best friend Okja, is a friendly gigantic pig. But when an evil food company, headed by Lucy Mirando (Tilda Swinton) and Dr. Johnny Wilcox (Jake Gyllenhall), takes Okja into captivity for experiments, Mija sets out on a rescue mission with the help of Red (Collins) and Jay (Paul Dano). Collins, fresh off Warren Beatty’s Rules Don’t Apply, wasn’t the slightest bit overwhelmed by the Cannes experienced, but she did admit it was a lot to take in. “Premiering a film here is surreal, I’ve never seen so many photographers in one space—the music, everything, it’s so strange. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever experienced.”

So this is your first Cannes!

Yes, it’s so fun, but it’s so much. There’s really never a dull moment. it keeps you guessing— you’re like, what am I going to do next? What else can I fit into my schedule?

Did Tilda Swinton or Bong Joo Hoo give you any advice about the festival before?

Tilda was saying it’s going to be unlike anything I had ever seen. She told me to just soak it all in. I was talking to Paul and Jake about what happens after the premiere, when it all finishes— there is either clapping or booing, and you have a camera on you, and your seated in the center of the cinema. They were prepping me on when that might happen, so when the credits finished I was gearing up. It’s the strangest thing, all of a sudden the camera films you to witness the audience’s response. And I just looked at my co-stars, like ‘This is so strange!’ It’s like a fish bowl; you’re in the middle of the theater. Director Bong has been on the jury before, and Tilda, Jake [Gyllenhaal], and Paul have too, so they’ve been giving me some pointers. I’ve also been running into people at the festival that I know, who have been so helpful in reaffirming the fact that it’s mental.

Published by Neide Published on May 16, 2017

If one look at Lily Collins’ Giambattista Valli gothic ballerina dress, paired with a blunt, black, bobbed wig at this year’s 2017 Met Gala didn’t have you swooning over the 28-year-old actress and her flawlessly executed fashion sense, you’re about to get a second opportunity to feel faint.

When it comes to the reality of growing up as a young star in Hollywood, the pressure to be perfect, and her reason for playing determined, female characters on camera, Lily doesn’t mince her words.

A day after revealing that former First Lady, Michelle Obama, had sent her a personal ‘thank you’ letter after receiving a copy of her book, Unfiltered, we sat down for a chat with the Golden Globes-nominated actress.

In a brilliant ELLE UK + Lily Collins session, we covered everything from growing up in Hollywood, women’s perception of beauty, her singing skills and her latest film, Rules Don’t Apply.

Let’s just say, the conversation didn’t disappoint.

Here’s what we found out from the Californian-based actress:

On being unafraid to show vulnerability

In Rules Don’t Apply, Collins plays chaste, Baptist 18-year-old beauty queen, Marla Mabrey, who moves into a Hollywood Hills house, paid for by American film director, Howard Hughes (played by Warren Beatty, who also directed the film) ahead of her screen test with the multi-millionaire, in the hope to find fame as a young actress.

Throughout the narrative, Marla’s determination is frequently tested as she’s manipulated by producers, directors and her own family.

However, while Marla is a headstrong teenager who isn’t afraid to stand up to her mother, Lucy, (played by Annette Bening) and Hughes, she’s also unafraid to show her frailty in the face of hardship – a quality Collins admires, greatly.

Published by Neide Published on May 15, 2017

The first time I saw my best friend after a year apart in 2002, I could barely see her at all.

We were attached at the hip throughout high school, bonding over boy obsessions and SAT prep. But after we’d both spent our first college semesters apart (her in New York, me in Pennsylvania), we reunited and I didn’t recognize her anymore. She was half her size. Her hair was thinner. She had permanent goosebumps. She had a “cold” that didn’t go away for weeks. And she had a strange new way of ordering chicken in restaurants: no skin, no oil, no sides.

While watching To the Bone, an upcoming Netflix film directed by Marti Noxon and starring Lily Collins (which premiered at Sundance earlier this year and sold to the streaming network for a massive $8 million), I immediately saw my friend in the lead character. Collins plays Ellen, a young artist reluctantly going through the motions of treatment for her severe anorexia. Her character’s baggy clothes, defiant nihilism, and habit of moving food around on a plate — it was all so familiar.

What my best friend, Collins, and Noxon all have in common is a history of anorexia. Thankfully, all three have recovered, but that doesn’t mean making the film was easy for everyone involved. Below, my conversation with Collins and Noxon, including how Collins handled having to lose weight in order to play this part and the matching tattoos that sealed the bond between director and star.

Published by Neide Published on March 20, 2017

 

If you think you know Lily Collins, get ready to go deeper. The actress and model has just added “author” to her impressive resume with a collection of super personal essays, Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me (HarperCollins, $24), out now, that she says was both terrifying and liberating to share. And no topic is off limits in the book including her strained relationship with her dad Phil Collins, and perhaps most private, her experience with eating disorders. She lays it all out there in the utterly relatable way her dedicated fans have come to expect, and with a singular purpose: to help people who have been through similar things feel less alone.

We caught up with the 28-year-old fresh on the heels of her LA book signing to talk about anxiety, critics and the unexpected side effect of her book’s release that she calls “a really nice gift to be given.”

Why did you decide to write the book?

I did a lot of self-reflection and work on myself in the past two years and I came to a lot of deeper understandings about the things that I’ve gone through. The more I talked about it to other people, the more they were saying “Oh my god, I’ve been through that as well. I had no idea that you would have experienced that.” And it made me feel less alone and I thought, If it makes me feel less alone then chances are if I speak out, more people will feel the same way. I just happened to start writing it right before I got the script for To the Bone and that dealt with subject matter that I talk about in the book and I felt like Wow, obviously there’s a reason that I’m writing about this stuff now. I’m still young but I’m older than I was ten years ago and I’ve learned more about myself so I thought these are the most relevant things that are going on with me right now and chances are if I’ve been through them, someone else will have and it may help spark conversations among other people if I speak up and tell my truth.

Published by Neide Published on March 8, 2017

Get ready: you’re about to know Lily Collins on a whole different level. The actress and model is opening up in a big way with a book, Unfiltered: an essay collection that captures some of her deepest secrets, biggest challenges, and experiences that ultimately shaped who she is today.

Lily, who stars in the upcoming film To The Bone which premiered at Sundance, covers a lot of ground in her memoir. Her book opens with a story about how she once “hacked away” at her eyebrows, fearing that she was different from the other girls in school. After she transformed her full eyebrows into skinny ones, her mother taught her a valuable lesson that she has not forgotten: “The quirky things that make you different are what make you beautiful.”

But that self-acceptance has, understandably, not always been easy. Through Unfiltered, Lily opens up about her experience in an emotionally abusive relationship, dealing with eating disorders, and struggling with her appearance. Throughout, her voice is equally compelling as it is familiar, like having a late-night conversation with your best friend.

The chapters are not just a way of reaching others, but a way for Lily to talk about things that haven’t always been easy for her to shed light on. By exposing her vulnerabilities to her fans, she’s hoping it’s that much easier for readers to talk about their own lives, too. Teen Vogue caught up with Lily to talk about what inspired her to write Unfiltered, what she hopes others learn, and how some of these anecdotes stay with her to this day.

Miss Lily Collins • Fan source for actress Lily Collins